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Posted by Edna on Sep 30, 2014

Following in the Footsteps: The Saga of the Xarelto Lawsuit

It should not come as a surprise that the first Xarelto lawsuit has been filed barely three years after the anticoagulant drug was approved in July 2011 by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) initially as prophylactic treatment for patients that had recently undergone hip or knee replacement surgery and later for atrial fibrillation, pulmonary embolism, and deep vein thrombosis. After all, its predecessor though not class-mate Pradaxa (dabigatran) from Boehringer Ingelheim got FDA approval in 2010 is already knee-deep in lawsuits for bleeding side effects. Why should manufacturer Bayer Corp. and US distributor Janssen Ortho LLC (a division of Johnson & Johnson) expect anything different?

Both Xarelto and Pradaxa are alternatives to the standard anticoagulant medication warfarin, which proved its efficacy in reducing the incidence of blood clots as far back as 1950. The problem with warfarin was that it was difficult to administer; it required regular monitoring and frequent dosage adjustments to account for interactions with certain foods. Xarelto and Pradaxa, on the other hand, were taken once a day and did not require regular monitoring for safe use. On the downside, both Xarelto and Pradaxa have no known reversal agent unlike warfarin which could be effectively and immediately counteracted with a dose of Vitamin K, so when a patient starts bleeding in reaction to a dose of either Xarelto or Pradaxa, they’ll continue bleeding until the drug flushes out of the system. Not good.

Xarelto is a direct factor Xa (10-a) inhibitor, also known as a xaban, a class of anticoagulants that acts directly on factor Xa of the coagulation cascade. Pradaxa, on the other hand, is a direct thrombin inhibitor. This difference makes no difference, so to speak; both classes of anticoagulants share the same problem of uncontrollable bleeding with no way of reversing it. Warfarin also had this issue, but it could be reversed.

If you have suffered serious injuries from using Xarelto which was supposed to be safer than warfarin then you may have a personal injury case against Janssen and Bayer. Contact a dangerous drugs lawyer in your area to find out if you qualify for and how to file a Xarelto lawsuit.

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One Response to “Following in the Footsteps: The Saga of the Xarelto Lawsuit”

  1. Criminal defense is serious business and I am grateful that someone is writing about it.

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